The student news of St. Paul Academy and Summit School

The Rubicon

The student news of St. Paul Academy and Summit School

The Rubicon

The student news of St. Paul Academy and Summit School

The Rubicon

First job tips and tricks from employed students

LEARN & GROW. Jobs set teens up for success when they are older. It gives you social skills as well as customer service skills and opportunities with hands-on activity, senior Audrey Leatham said.
Zadie Martin
LEARN & GROW. Jobs set teens up for success when they are older. “It gives you social skills as well as customer service skills and opportunities with hands-on activity,” senior Audrey Leatham said.

There are plenty of reasons for teenagers to get a job. It can help teens save up for a car or college fund, or give them some extra cash to spend. But for many teens, jobs are difficult to find. Not only do many high school students have other commitments that take up time (like sports, homework, play practice, etc.), but there are limited opportunities for people with little to no work experience.
Senior Drew Barker recommends getting a job that is not overly complicated: “A suitable first job would be something that’s basic and allows you to get experience with interacting with customers.”
Senior Audrey Leatham said getting a job with a healthy environment is important. “I really like my boss and I think it’s a really good environment. It gives you social skills as well as customer service skills and opportunities with hands-on activity. Most people that are employed are in their teens, like college or high school. So it’s a nice environment,” she said.
Junior Harper Glass reciprocates the sentiment and recommends getting a job where other teenagers work or are present. She said, “The environment was I worked with all adults, a lot of older adults, and the customers were adults, too. So it was kind of an intimidating environment.”
Getting experience is extremely important when picking out a first job. It helps with resume-building and paving the road for future jobs. Hands-on experience helps individuals develop and refine teamwork and patience skills, fostering a deeper understanding of workplace practices and trends. Tailor each resume for each application, emphasizing experiences and skills that align with the specific job requirements.
To gain experience more easily, Barker says big industry jobs are the answer. “I would say the easiest jobs to find would be in a fast food area or a basic clerk job at Target or Walmart, and the hardest jobs to get would be where they aren’t expecting you to be a teenager,” said Barker.
It also helps to build a strong resume. Organizing information that could help land a job and clearly listing contact information is a great way to begin writing a resume. In the contact details section, include full name, phone number, email address and any online job searching profile. Students should focus on showcasing accomplishments and quantify their achievements whenever possible to display their impact.
In Leatham’s experience, curating her resume was hard because of all the options. She said, “My mother told me [my resume] was bad and that hurt my feelings. She did not like the format that I had it in. It’s kind of hard not knowing what to include because there are so many templates out there but just taking the time to do it and making sure it’s good and it’s something you’d want to get hired based off of. I’d say that’s kind of a time-consuming process.”

My dad would quiz me on things that they could ask: what are your strengths? What are your weaknesses? Why do you want this job?

— Harper Glass

When adding references, Leatham said, “I have one job reference and I have my previous work experience there.” She used people she knew from cat sitting and her neighborhood who could attest to her responsibility.
As for the application process, Barker kept a few things in mind. He said, “Applying for [being a fast food worker] wasn’t that hard, but when you got to the interview it’s pretty nerve-wracking. But then once you get sat down, the questions are pretty basic and pretty straightforward. Like, what you’ve done so far, what you’re good at and what you’re bad at. They walk you through it.”
When preparing for the interview, Glass had her parents help. She said, “My dad would quiz me on things that they could ask: what are your strengths? What are your weaknesses? Why do you want this job? […] My mom helped me get ready for it and be less nervous.”
Both Barker and Leatham recommended using as much in-person time as possible during the application process. It ensures a full understanding of the job requirements and environment and helps employers get a more accurate assessment.
Having a job as a teenager is a big responsibility but can definitely be manageable for most. Having a job can be pivotal for personal and career development.

Leave a Comment
More to Discover
About the Contributor
Zadie Martin, Feature Editor
My name is Zadie Martin(she/her). I work as a Feature Editor for the RubicOnline. At school, I’m involved in book club and choir. I love to ramble about sci-fi and character building. I can be reached at [email protected].

Comments (0)

Comments are welcomed on most stories at The Rubicon online. The Rubicon hopes this promotes thoughtful and meaningful discussion. We do not permit or publish libel or defamatory statements; comments that advertise or try to sell to the community; any copyrighted, trademarked or intellectual property of others; the use of profanity. Comments will be moderated, but not edited, and will post after they are approved by the Director of RubicOnline.  It is at the discretion of the staff to close the comments option on stories.
All The Rubicon Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.