It is not too late to have an academic comeback

JUST IN TIME. Finals season has started, but that does not mean it is too late for an “academic comeback”.
JUST IN TIME. Finals season has started, but that does not mean it is too late for an “academic comeback”.
Mariam Malik

Finals season has started, but that does not mean it is too late for an “academic comeback”. The term, which first gained traction on social media last year, is commonly used among teenagers. Having an academic comeback means improving one’s grades at the end of a term after previously struggling with them. Most declare their “academic comebacks” after receiving a slew of low grades.

The need for an “academic comeback” stems from struggling with burnout. Positively labeling an academic-obsessed student as “dedicated” or “driven” reinforces their perceived need to be the best they can be at all times. Such harmful mindsets do not create motivated kids, but rather, emotionally exhausted ones. The American Psychological Association reports that over half of high school students are regularly labeled as burnt out. When emotional exhaustion remains unaddressed, grades naturally begin to slip.

SPA’s rigorous academic curriculum makes overvaluing grades a slippery slope. Although bouncing back at the end of the year to raise grades is not ideal, it is not impossible. The year is not over yet and there is still time to end the school year on a high note.

The year is not over yet and there is still time to end the school year on a high note.

After a hectic year of school, backpacks and desks are scattered with note sheets, broken pencils, miscellaneous flashcards, and more. One of the biggest favors one can do for themselves is to clean their space. The best comebacks begin with a fresh slate.

Finals week is arguably one of the most chaotic times of the school year. Excessive studying and juggling multiple assignments at once risks forgetfulness and exhaustion which risks just “winging” exams. The brain overloads with all the information being absorbed while studying so anything that is not shifted to long-term memory is forgotten.

Although the short-term memory may be active during cramming, it refuses to reconstruct any material reviewed afterwards. The pitfalls of short-term memory retention are why cramming is not an effective way to study. Instead, use a calendar or planner to visualize upcoming deadlines, study sessions, and more.

It does not matter which method is most commonly used or not, the main idea is to not lose momentum. Consistent studying will help the long-term memory retain information for a longer period of time. Making an “academic comeback” is not easy, but the effort pays off.

Leave a Comment
More to Discover

Comments (0)

Comments are welcomed on most stories at The Rubicon online. The Rubicon hopes this promotes thoughtful and meaningful discussion. We do not permit or publish libel or defamatory statements; comments that advertise or try to sell to the community; any copyrighted, trademarked or intellectual property of others; the use of profanity. Comments will be moderated, but not edited, and will post after they are approved by the Director of RubicOnline.  It is at the discretion of the staff to close the comments option on stories.
All The Rubicon Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.