The student news of St. Paul Academy and Summit School

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The student news of St. Paul Academy and Summit School

The Rubicon

The student news of St. Paul Academy and Summit School

The Rubicon

Time off for mental health as important as physical illness

In a world that glorifies productivity and champions the hustle, this global culture often overlooks the importance of mental well-being. Instead, people place value on constant activity rather than recognizing the significance of mental health days, which the Mayo Clinic defines as “a limited time away from your usual responsibilities with the intention of recharging your mental health.”

However, it’s necessary that mental health days are treated the same understanding and acceptance as sick days for physical ailments. Just as bodies can succumb to illness, minds too, need moments of rest. Mental health days are not a luxury; they are a necessity for an overall well-being.

In a culture that glorifies the grind, it takes strength to say, “Today, I need a break for my mental well-being.” It’s an admission that, like everyone else, people are susceptible to the strains of life, and that’s perfectly okay. Mental health is not a constant; it fluctuates, and acknowledging those fluctuations is a sign of emotional intelligence.

In the United States, the prevalence of mental illness is alarmingly high, with more than one in five citizens grappling with various mental health challenges, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In the face of this staggering statistic, it becomes apparent that acknowledging and addressing mental health concerns is not just a social matter but a societal imperative. Suppressing the concept of mental health days yields no benefits; instead, it perpetuates a harmful stigma that inhibits individuals from seeking the necessary support and care.

The stigma surrounding mental health days is substantiated by a recent study by Breeze on the reaction and perception of working class individuals on mental health days. 78% of respondents reported experiencing a positive impact from taking mental health days. However, nearly half of them (44%) reported concerns that their employers might react negatively to the idea of a mental health day. Foster a culture of openness and understanding regarding mental health day, extending beyond a workplace to encompass other areas like school. Lay a foundation that ingrains the idea that seeking a mental health day should be as natural as any other form of leave, without the fear of jeopardizing one’s work position or social identity.

In a world that constantly demands attention and energy, celebrate the courage it takes to pause and prioritize mental health. Take a moment—try a mental health day.

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About the Contributor
Juan Miguel Adams, Sports Editor
Hi, my name is Juan Miguel Adams (he/him) I’m a Sports Editor for The Rubicon this year. At school, I’m involved in playing ultimate frisbee. I also love to play the saxophone and travel. You can reach me at [email protected].

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