Artists take their work beyond the art hallway

This+abstract+portrait+by+Tiedemann+was+made+using+only+markers.+%E2%80%9CI+do+a+lot+of+drawing+and+painting+with+ink+and+a+lot+of+messing+around+with+whatever+materials+I+have%2C%E2%80%9D+she+said.

Gitanjali Raman

This abstract portrait by Tiedemann was made using only markers. “I do a lot of drawing and painting with ink and a lot of messing around with whatever materials I have,” she said.

Gitanjali Raman, Copy Editor

Taking a trip down the art hallway, it is clear to see that artistic minds are at work. A glance towards the left, paintings are showing, and displayed on the right are black and white photographs. The materials to write, draw, and create with in the art wing are abundant. Students who work in this creative space express emotions, imagination, and dreams using their hands.

“I have to do stuff with my hands and build things,” senior Daniela Tiedemann said. Tiedemann’s art is usually created spontaneously. “I do a lot of drawing and painting with ink and a lot of messing around with whatever materials I have,” she said.

Working with the materials around her has produced some unique results. “I make really really tiny stuff, I carve crayons into sculptures,” Tiedemann said. She has made crayon sculptures of chess pieces, bears, and everything in between. Now, she is focused on cutting patterns in leaves.

…but since then I’ve been working on architectural drawings and I’ve never looked back.”

— senior Luke Bishop

Senior Luke Bishop makes realistic drawings. “I draw pictures of objects such as shoes, chairs, and hallways,” he said.

“A few weeks ago I was working with a theme involving triangles, but since then I’ve been working on architectural drawings and I’ve never looked back,” Bishop said. His current architectural drawing is his favorite piece. It resembles Greek architecture, using straight and curved lines. “It takes what I like from my other drawings and puts it together. It’s working out really well,” Bishop said.

Art has grown side by side with mankind since the time of the cavemen, and often displays the memories or events in the life of the artist. “It kind of keeps a record of my ideas and my thoughts at the time. I think of something that is really cool or I see something really cool, and I want to remake it and remember it. If I create it then I know that I don’t really have to remember for the rest of my life because I can always look at it again,” Tiedemann said.

Bishop likes the fact that an idea can transform into a physical object. “It makes my ideas tangible, so I actually have something to look at and hold, instead of it just being an idea,” Bishop said.

As the old saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. Students at SPA have shown that they try to live up to that, using art as an outlet for the expression of feelings, emotions and ideas and trying to capture the world around them.