Concerts are coming back in late 2021

For fans of live music events, concerts, and festivals, the COVID-19 lockdown was devastating news. But things are looking up for those people now.

Things+are+looking+up%2C+and+that+means+the+revival+of+in-person+large+events.

Lara Cayci

Things are looking up, and that means the revival of in-person large events.

Large public events unavoidably came to a halt during the pandemic, but with the several vaccines being administered, some of these will come back in the following year. One of the largest wake-up calls to how things were closing down last spring was when the famous music festival “Coachella” was cancelled due to the spread of COVID-19. This was a big shocker to people at the time, since Coachella was such a big deal, and began the period of time where there were absolutely no in person concerts. For fans of live music events, concerts, and festivals, the COVID-19 lockdown was devastating news. But things are looking up for those people now.

When [concerts] come back, it’ll be super crazy and exciting for everyone.”

— senior Fiona Rucker

Things are looking up, and that means the revival of in-person large events. Concerts are something to look forward to, as they’re one of the main things people missed. Also, it’s something that signifies the return to normalcy. “Concerts were definitely one of the first things to go,” said senior Fiona Rucker. “When they come back, it’ll be super crazy and exciting for everyone.”
In Minnesota, there are already lineups released from musicians about their future dates. While many have gotten cancelled and rescheduled, they are still in the works. Some dates that are currently being prepared for are for 5SOS, Guns n’ Roses, Deftones, Harry Styles, and many more. Large scale music festivals in the US are still currently being rescheduled—Lollapalooza and the previously mentioned Coachella—since those are definitely more risky, and will only be happening if COVID-19 is completely taken care of by the dates of the festivals.
Safety and controlling the spread of the virus is definitely the number one priority, so understanding this and being flexible in case of cancellation is important. “If cases spike, I’m totally okay with no concerts,” said Rucker. “I really hope that doesn’t happen though, and I think most people would agree even if they don’t enjoy live music.” The dates being announced shows that the end of the pandemic is within reach.