Opinion: United States Senate should not have refused to pass gun control reforms

Opinion: United States Senate should not have refused to pass gun control reforms

The Senate recently put down all gun control reforms proposed by President Obama, including the Manchin-Toomey background check amendment. Despite the devastating attacks that have been issued all throughout the country this past year, the Senate denied to reform legislation to help prevent future tragedies. In the proposal were expanded background checks to ensure that the mentally unstable as well as other unsuitable owners could not easily gain access to a firearm, bans on semi-automatic assault rifles, and other protective measures.

Despite strong public support, the bill was not allowed to pass because our U.S. Senators were too busy worrying about their political career and the negative effects the NRA would inflict upon them if they voted in favor of the amendment instead of thinking about the people of this nation and their safety and well-being. Recent polls have shown that 90% of Americans support expanded background checks for gun purchases, yet the Senate still refused to pass the bill. Leading up to the votes, members of the National Rifle Association peppered Senators with emails, letters, phone calls, and other forms of communication swaying them not to vote in favor of the amendment and threatening their future political careers on it. To the NRA, these measures would not in any way increase safety for our kids in school and simply take away people’s liberties. However, they fail to note how one needs a semi-automatic rifle modeled after those used in military combat to exercise safe and fun gun use for hunting or trap shooting.

According to a recent Rasmussen poll on April 9th, only 8% of citizens give Congress a good to great mark. This is a major issue, which will only be further exacerbated with the Senate choosing to listen to the large gun lobby instead of the citizen constituents for which it is supposed to represent. On the day of the disapproval, President Obama asked of Congress, “Who are we here to represent?” Mr. Obama poses a very prudent question, as Congress can be sheen shifting more and more towards large corporations and leaving the small citizen on his own. When the wants of the minority are always chosen over the needs of the majority, Congress is clearly going about their business wrong. It would seem to be more important to protect the safety of individuals throughout this country, especially children, than it would to nurture a future political career. However, for the members of the Senate and other members of the House who were ready to shoot down the bill had it passed the Senate voting, this does not hold true. As more and more helpful legislation is voted down, we as citizens can only sit and wonder, who are they here to represent, truthfully?