Red white and blue? For some, USA Day meant black

Seniors Olivia Williams-Ridge and Amina Smaller present their black outfits.

Tristan Hitchens-Brookins

Seniors Olivia Williams-Ridge and Amina Smaller present their black outfits. "I’m wearing black because the American flag does not represent anything but oppression to me," Smaller said.

The Homecoming dress-up days are a predictable and playful part of the week-long experience, but USA day on Oct. 4 split the student body about the statement they wanted to make about USA identity. This year, a group of students chose to wear black instead of red, white, and blue clothing in order to send a message.

“I’m tired of everything that’s been happening. Since I can’t do anything to contribute to a movement that I want to be a part of, [this is my way to] help it become ever-present and unavoidable in our day to day lives,” senior Noah Solomon said.

Solomon wore a black jacket and black pants in order to send his message.

I chose to wear a black shirt because the American flag still does not represent freedom for all that live in this country.”

— Tess Hick

Senior Tess Hick wore her clothes to convey a similar sentiment. “I chose to wear a black shirt because the American flag still does not represent freedom for all that live in this country, as well as international affairs,” she said.

Hick wore a black shirt, but wore red and white apparel as well.

Eva Garcia also made a statement clear with her black outfit: “I’m wearing black not because I hate America, but because I can’t deal with how my people and other minorities are treated,” she said.

Amina Smaller said, “I’m wearing black because the American flag does not represent anything but oppression to me. I will not wear or celebrate this country until this country sends the message to me and my people that we matter,” she said.