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Minnesota could be the next state to legalize weed

%E2%80%9CI+think+it%E2%80%99s+going+to+help+a+lot+of+people+with+cancer+who+are+in+pain%2C+and+it%E2%80%99s+really+important+for+all+of+us+to+help+people+who+are+struggling+to+feel+better.+And+I+think+some+of+the+best+ways+to+do+that+is+with+marijuana%2C%E2%80%9D+says+Gabby+Harmoning.
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Minnesota could be the next state to legalize weed

“I think it’s going to help a lot of people with cancer who are in pain, and it’s really important for all of us to help people who are struggling to feel better. And I think some of the best ways to do that is with marijuana,” says Gabby Harmoning.

“I think it’s going to help a lot of people with cancer who are in pain, and it’s really important for all of us to help people who are struggling to feel better. And I think some of the best ways to do that is with marijuana,” says Gabby Harmoning.

Flickr Creative Commons

“I think it’s going to help a lot of people with cancer who are in pain, and it’s really important for all of us to help people who are struggling to feel better. And I think some of the best ways to do that is with marijuana,” says Gabby Harmoning.

Flickr Creative Commons

Flickr Creative Commons

“I think it’s going to help a lot of people with cancer who are in pain, and it’s really important for all of us to help people who are struggling to feel better. And I think some of the best ways to do that is with marijuana,” says Gabby Harmoning.

Isabel Saavedra-Weis, RubicOnline Editor

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Forbes magazine recently published a list, predicting which states will be added to the current ten states that have legalized weed. Minnesota was on that list.

Legalizing marijuana has been a hot topic in the land of ten thousand lakes, especially during the most recent midterm elections. Two pro-marijuana groups – “Legal Marijuana Now” and “Legalize Cannabis” – were options on the midterm ballots as major political parties. Governor elect Tim Walz supports the legalization of weed as well, saying that “I just think the time is here and we’re seeing it across the country. Minnesota has always been able to implement these things right.”

Many benefits of legalized weed have been raised. Politicians and police wouldn’t have to work to enforce the laws against weed anymore. Less people would be locked up. Families with members in jail for marijuana-related crime would be reunited.

“I’m really excited for the legalization of marijuana in this state,” senior Gabby Harmoning said.

“I think it’s going to help a lot of people with cancer who are in pain, and it’s really important for all of us to help people who are struggling to feel better. And I think some of the best ways to do that is with marijuana.”

However, there are some barriers. Legalizing weed raises the issue of increases in car crashes, teenagers using, mental illness, addiction, and dependency. Some feel as though there should be more research done about the effects of legalizing recreational pot before Minnesota takes any measures. Junior Annika Findlay is concerned with how often she would have to be around marijuana if it was legal.

“I don’t really like substance use, and it makes me uncomfortable, so I don’t really want to walk outside and smell weed,” she says. However, she’s willing to get over her discomfort for the decrease of incarceration that would occur.

The issues I have right now is that the people who get in trouble for [smoking weed] are predominantly people of color, and then they go to jail for something that white people will get a warning for. That bothers me a lot.”

— Annika Findlay

“The issues I have right now is that the people who get in trouble for [smoking weed] are predominantly people of color, and then they go to jail for something that white people will get a warning for. That bothers me a lot,” Findlay says.

As for Minnesota actually legalizing weed in 2019, as Forbes foresaw, the current division of Minnesota’s legislature would make such a movement tricky, since both houses would have to pass the law.

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About the Writer
Isabel Saavedra-Weis, Opinions Editor

Isabel Saavedra-Weis is the Co-Editor of Opinion on the RubicOnline. She also is behind the blog No Right Answer. This is her fourth year on staff. Recently,...

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