Color away stress with an adult coloring book

Sophomore+Izzy+Denny++colors+in+a+page+of+her+book+Secret+Gardens.+%22It%27s+really+relaxing+and+mindless%2C+but+it%27s+so+satisfying+when+you%27re+done%2C%22+Denny+said.
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Color away stress with an adult coloring book

Sophomore Izzy Denny  colors in a page of her book Secret Gardens.

Sophomore Izzy Denny colors in a page of her book Secret Gardens. "It's really relaxing and mindless, but it's so satisfying when you're done," Denny said.

Dianne Caravela

Sophomore Izzy Denny colors in a page of her book Secret Gardens. "It's really relaxing and mindless, but it's so satisfying when you're done," Denny said.

Dianne Caravela

Dianne Caravela

Sophomore Izzy Denny colors in a page of her book Secret Gardens. "It's really relaxing and mindless, but it's so satisfying when you're done," Denny said.

Dianne Caravela, Feature Editor

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Think coloring is just for five years olds? Think again. Adult coloring books have become a popular pastime for many people well past elementary school. Although some critics argue that coloring for grown-ups is an unproductive, lazy activity compared to doing something like drawing or reading , those who enjoy it find it has numerous benefits such as increased mindfulness and relaxation.

“It’s really relaxing and mindless, but it’s so satisfying when you’re done,” sophomore Izzy Denny, who began coloring over Winter Break said.  “My friend gave me another coloring book for Christmas, and then I got another one for my birthday a couple of weeks later.”

Freshman Max Moen also got a coloring book called Fantastic Cities this Christmas, after seeing a picture of in a Buzzfeed article.

“It’s about a city, so you color in all these buildings and stuff like that. I like to use it every Tutorial because it’s a great way to relax and relieve stress. I find myself just wanting to go to my advisory and color during every tutorial; it’s kind of funny,” Moen said.

In fact, coloring patterned pictures, such as mandalas, has been shown to reduce stress and anxiety more than just doodling does.

“I think [coloring’s ability to relieve stress] is undervalued.  It’s my way of disconnecting from the world,” Moen said.

Senior Maggie Vlietstra, who has a coloring book featuring artwork from artists displayed at the Walker Art Museum, likes to multitask while she colors.

“I listen to podcasts and I watch T.V. while I color. I feel more productive when I’m doing something at the same time,” Vlietstra said. “It’s nice because I like art, but I’m also not very good drawing, so there’s not a lot of pressure. I can just fill in the lines and It’ll look good at the end.”

The trend continues to gain popularity.  Amazon.com now has a list devoted exclusively to bestselling adult coloring books.

 

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